2013 CSA Week 6

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One thing about getting this much fresh food straight from the farm is that it doesn’t last as long as under-ripe supermarket produce.  It’s been a challenge to eat through it all.

This week’s haul:

  • Snow peas
  • Cabbage (again!  I’m running out of ideas!)
  • 2 little cucumbers
  • Tomatoes
  • Strawberries
  • Beets
  • Green onions
  • Asparagus
  • Eggs
  • Lettuce

I see lots of salads in my future because we still have so much lettuce!

2013 CSA Week 5

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Sorry for the week off guys.  I live in Oklahoma, so we’ve had a lot of tornadoes lately, and while the posts I had in the queue went up, I’ve run out of buffer.  I’m going to rebuild it today, as well as put up a post in the next couple days for people who want to help.  My place wasn’t hit, but the town just north of me was hit really bad (you may have seen Moore, OK on the news lately).

Our farmer was thankfully not hit either, so this week we have:

  • Eggs
  • Beets
  • Snow peas
  • Two small cucumbers
  • Green onions
  • Another (!) head of cabbage
  • Bunch of asparagus
  • A bag of lettuce
  • A bunch of strawberries (nice and fresh this time!)

We’re still working through the stashes we’ve got, so hopefully I’ll also have new recipes to post as we try to think of creative ways to use up the vegetables.  This is probably one of the healthiest moves we’ve ever made.

2013 CSA Week 4

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Week 4.  We are not quite getting through things fast enough, and this basket is huge for us!  Expect lots of new recipe posts as we try to use this.

  • Eggs
  • A whole green cabbage
  • Whole beets
  • Tomatoes
  • Broccoli
  • Sugar snap peas?
  • Strawberries (these ended up being too far gone, even by the time we got them.  Could have been the bad weather lately, or when the farmer picked them.  We’re not sure.)
  • Green onions
  • Asparagus
  • A head of lettuce

2013 CSA Week 3

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We’re still working through our previous baskets, but as of tonight, we’re almost caught up.  I’ll be having a post up soon about how I used up a bunch of the veggies all at once.

This week we have:

  • Swiss Chard
  • Green Kale
  • A head of lettuce (not sure what type, romaine, maybe?)
  • Eggs
  • Radishes
  • Asparagus
  • Green Onions
  • Strawberries (huzzah!)

2013 CSA Week 2

Ok, so there was a lot of food in that basket.  We’re still eating through it all.  The hardest thing to get through are the greens, because while we like salads, we rarely make a whole meal of them.  We have fewer leftovers to work through in the fridge, so we’ll hopefully be getting through this haul a bit better.
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This week:

  • Tomatoes
  • Asparagus
  • Radishes
  • Tiny beets!
  • Eggs
  • Baby green onions
  • Swiss chard
  • Lettuce
  • Green Kale

The challenge this week is again the greens.  I’m seeing lots of salads, and maybe a risotto in my future.

2013 CSA Week 1

This year, Andrew and I signed up for a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture).  Basically, we pay a farmer for a season, and in return, we get a basket of some of their crop.  CSAs are great if you’re into local or real food, and can’t manage a large garden of your own.  This is our first time doing this, and we really like our farmers.  They don’t use any pesticides on their crop and also offer milk and various meats that we hope to try later in the season.  For those who haven’t tried a CSA before, I’ll be posting photos of our haul each week.

Some notes:  We signed up for the “small” share, which is supposed to feed 1-2 people.  A CSA may seem expensive for the price, but as you’ll see, you can get a lot of food.  I doubt Andrew and I will have to buy very much produce while we’re doing this.  Also, our farmer has greenhouses, so they are able to offer us things like tomatoes in early May after the weather here has been awful for tomatoes.

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In this week’s basket:

  • Swiss Chard
  • Strawberries
  • Green Onions
  • Lettuce
  • Leeks
  • Eggs
  • Radishes
  • Tomatoes
  • Asparagus

And just think, we’ll be getting another basket next week!  I’m excited to come up with ways to eat this delicious haul.

Recipe du Jour: Homemade Pumpkin Puree

Just a quick sidenote to announce the creation of two more pages: The Recipe Index and the How-To Index. Of course, you can still use the tags or the search function to find things like this, but if you’d like to see a big list of everything without scrolling through the posts, these are the way to do it.

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As part of my real food project, I try to eat as seasonally as I can. I avoid strawberries in December, and apples in the spring. While we do live in a world with a global economy that allows us to have foods from all over the map at any given moment, this isn’t the way food was meant to be consumed. Also, most of the time, in order to look nice when it gets to you, the produce has been picked before it’s ripe. Varieties have been bred in order to survive the long abusive shipping time, not necessarily to taste good. So if you want the best taste out of your food (and want to save a little coin), it’s best to eat in season, when the plants would have given it to you.

This makes each season a special treat for me, and one of the things I love about fall and winter is that I get to use pumpkin. I love pumpkin, and I love baking with it. Now, the canned stuff is ok, but if you’re going to cook with pumpkin, why not go all out? Make your own homemade pumpkin puree.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pie pumpkin

You need a pie pumpkin because jack-o-lantern pumpkins are too tough and have very thin flesh. Not good for eating.

Directions:

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees F. Cut the pumpkin in half, like you would a hamburger bun, with the stem on top of one piece. Clean out the seeds and strings. It doesn’t have to be perfect. Put a piece of parchment paper down on a cookie sheet. Place the pumpkin halves on the parchment paper, cut side down. Toss in the oven for about an hour, until you can tell the pumpkin is soft, either by appearance, or inserting a knife or fork. Pull out of the oven, let cool. Once you can handle the pumpkin, scoop out the flesh, into a blender or food processor. It should be very soft and you should be able to just scrape it off the inside of the skin. Puree until smooth. Store in an airtight container.

Notes:

In the fridge, this might last a week, depending on how wet your pumpkin is. In the freezer, it lasts a long time. I don’t know when it goes bad because I’ve always used it up before then. If you notice a liquid from your puree, just drain it off. It’s a side effect of the pumpkin cooking, and you don’t want it if you want your puree to behave like the canned stuff. Use in equal portions as you would canned pumpkin.

Also, I have heard of methods of boiling pumpkin, but that involved peeling it, cutting it small, and the end product was way too watery. I like the roasting method because it gives me a nice caramelized flavor, a not so wet puree, and it’s easier.